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TYAN Launches Server Platforms Based on Xeon Scalable Processors

Tue, 07/11/2017 - 11:43

TAIPEI, Taiwan, July 11, 2017 – TYAN, an industry-leading server platform design manufacturer and subsidiary of MiTAC Computing Technology Corporation, has announced their new generation Intel Xeon Scalable Processor-based server platforms to the market. The new line-up of HPC, cloud computing and storage server platforms deliver workload-optimized performance, power efficiency, and hardware-enhanced features to enterprise, cloud and hyperscale datacenters.

“Thanks to features such as Intel AVX-512 extensions, Intel Omni-Path and Intel Volume Management Devices, these new Intel Xeon Scalable Processors enable TYAN server platforms to deliver performance, capacity, I/O connectivity and efficiency improvements, and address the needs of existing and emerging HPC, data analytics and security workloads.” said Danny Hsu, Vice President of MiTAC Computing Technology Corporation’s TYAN Business Unit.

“The Intel Xeon Scalable Processor is built upon an advanced 14nm process technology and offers up to 28 cores, 56 threads, 1.5x memory bandwidth with 6 channels DDR4, and Intel AVX-512 which can deliver up to 2x more floating-point operations per clock cycle,” said Jennifer Huffstetler, senior director, data center product management, Intel. “For customers refreshing 4-year-old servers, this compelling feature set delivers up to 4.2x more virtualization performance for cloud and enterprise customers and up to 8.2x more floating-point performance for HPC customers. ”

High-density HPC Computing Platforms Optimized for Supercomputing and Machine Learning Applications

TYAN’s new HPC computing platforms are based on the Intel Xeon Scalable Processors and are designed for the heavy computing workloads of big data and high performance data analysis applications. The high-density platforms are targeted at the HPC, Machine Learning, and Technical Computing markets.

The FT77D-B7109 is a 4U dual root complex server with two CPU sockets and supports for up to 8 Intel Xeon Phi coprocessors and 24 DIMM slots. It specializes in massively parallel workloads including scientific computing, genetic sequencing, oil & gas discovery, large scale facial recognition, and cryptography.

TYAN’s GA88-B5631 is a fully peer-to-peer single root complex 1U server. Featuring a single Intel Xeon Scalable Processor socket, the platform supports up to 4 Intel Xeon Phi coprocessors and a Full Height / Half Length PCIe x16 card to accommodate a networking adapter speeds up to 100Gb/s such as EDR InfiniBand or 100 Gigabit Ethernet. The platform is ideal for many of today’s emerging cognitive computing workloads such as Machine Learning and Artificial Intelligence.

Extreme Performance, Density and Scalability Features for Next-Generation Datacenter, Enterprise and Cloud

Powered by the Intel Xeon Scalable Processor, TYAN’s new range of cloud computing and storage platforms are optimized for data intensive workloads and virtualization applications to deliver extreme performance, density and scalability with power and cost efficiency.

The brand new TN200-B7108-X4S is a dual-socket 2U 4-Node all-flash server platform supports up to 24 2.5” NVMe U.2/SATA drives. Each node gets 8 NVMe drives across 6 PCIe x4 NVME U.2 hot-swap drive bays up front and a pair of internal 2280/22110 NVMe M.2 ports. Each node also has a low profile PCIe x16 slot, a low profile PCIe x8 slot, and an OCP v2.0 LAN Mezzanine slot with support for networking speeds up to 100Gb/s. The platform also has optional support for 100G Intel Omni-Path Fabric. With a cumulative total of 8 CPU sockets, 64 DIMM slots, and 32 NVMe devices across the entire chassis, the TN200-B7108-X4S can support up to 8,192GB total RAM and 8 processors within a single 2U enclosure. This makes it an ideal platform for High Performance Computing workloads and hyper-converged all-flash storage applications.

The 1U GT75B-B7102 features 24 DIMM slots to support extreme memory capacities up to 3,072GB of RAM and is an ideal platform for virtualization and in-memory databases like Apache Ignite. The GT75B-B7102 is a hybrid storage server featuring 10x 2.5″ small form factor SATA bays, four of which can support U.2 NVMe drives with an optional upgrade kit. The platform also provides an OCP LAN Mezzanine slot with support for speeds up to 50 Gigabit Ethernet along with a pair of PCIe x16 slots.

TYAN’s GT62F-B5630 is a 1U server platform designed for hybrid NVMe/SATA cache data storage with support for up to 8 hot-swap NVMe U.2 drives along with an OCP v2.0 LAN Mezzanine slot which supports networking speeds up to 100Gb/s. The single CPU socket design makes it an ideal platform for workloads that work best within a single NUMA domain and require large amounts of high-speed flash, such as many media streaming applications.

TYAN’s 2U TN76-B7102 with support for dual-socket Intel Xeon Scalable Processors, 2x GPUs, 24 DIMM slots, and 12 3.5″ hot-swap drive bays is designed for multiple application scenarios including technical computing and virtual machine deployment.

Video introductionhttps://youtu.be/uNRSZG_zTbQ

TYAN’s Intel Xeon Scalable Processor Family-based solutions:

HPC& Coprocessor  Platforms:

–       FT77D-B7109: 4U dual-socket Intel Xeon Scalable Processor-based platform with support for up to 8 Intel Xeon Phi coprocessor modules, 24 DDR4 DIMM slots, and 14 2.5” hot-swap SATA 6Gb/s devices.

–       GA88-B5631: 1U single-socket Intel Xeon Scalable Processor-based platform with support for up to 4 Intel Xeon Phi coprocessor modules, 12 DDR4 DIMM slots, and 2 2.5” hot-swap SATA 6Gb/s devices

Cloud and Storage Platforms:

–       TN200-B7108-X4S: 2U 4-node dual-socket Intel Xeon Scalable Processor-based platform with 16 DDR4 DIMM slots. The 4-node enclosure supports up to 24 2.5” NVMe U.2 or SATA 6Gb/s drives

–       GT75B-B7102: 1U dual-socket Intel Xeon Scalable Processor-based platform supports up to 24 DDR4 DIMM slots, 10 2.5” hot-swap SAS 12Gb/s or SATA 6Gb/s devices, and 4 of the bays can support NVMe U.2 drives

–       GT62F-B5630: 1U single-socket Intel Xeon Scalable Processor-based platform supports up to 12 DDR4 DIMM slots, 10 2.5” hot-swap SAS 12Gb/s or SATA 6Gb/s devices, and 8 of the bays can support NVMe U.2 drives

–       TN76-B7102: 2U dual-socket Intel Xeon Scalable Processor-based platform supports up to 24 DDR4 DIMM slots, and 12 3.5” hot-swap SAS 12Gb/s or SATA 6Gb/s devices

Embedded & Server Motherboards:

–       S7100: Dual-socket Intel Xeon Scalable Processor-based server board in SSI EEB (12” x 13”) form factor for both mainstream server and workstation applications

–       S7106: Dual-socket Intel Xeon Scalable Processor-based server board in rack-optimized, EATX (12” x 13”) form factor for 1U/2U server deployment

–       S5630: Single-socket Intel Xeon Scalable Processor-based server board in SSI CEB  (12” x 10.5”) form factor for server storage deployment

About TYAN

TYAN, as a leading server brand of Mitac Computing Technology Corporation under the MiTAC Group (TSE:3706), designs, manufactures and markets advanced x86 and x86-64 server/workstation board technology, platforms and server solution products. Its products are sold to OEMs, VARs, System Integrators and Resellers worldwide for a wide range of applications. TYAN enables its customers to be technology leaders by providing scalable, highly-integrated, and reliable products for a wide range of applications such as server appliances and solutions for high-performance computing and server/workstation used in markets such as CAD, DCC, E&P and HPC. For more information, visit MiTAC’s website at http://www.mitac.com or TYAN’s website at http://www.tyan.com

Source: TYAN

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Colfax Announces Support for Intel Xeon Scalable Processors

Tue, 07/11/2017 - 11:18

SUNNYVALE, Calif., July 11, 2017 – Colfax International, a leader provider of HPC and Data Center solutions, today announced broad and immediate availability of systems based on the new Intel Xeon Scalable processors, codenamed Skylake SP. This new addition to Colfax’s portfolio of server and workstation products seamlessly supports recent innovations in storage, networking and heterogeneous computing.

  • Server and pedestal systems: Colfax will support all processor family types, namely Platinum, Gold, Silver and Bronze. Colfax will integrate these CPUs into Intel’s server building blocks. Both rack- and pedestal-optimized form factors are being offered.
  • Performance improvement: Colfax’s new computing solutions feature up to 28 Intel cores per socket and come with 2-, 4- and 8-socket boards. Connected with the new Intel UPI and featuring an improved memory organization, new Intel Xeon Scalable processors achieve 45% and 50% greater bandwidth to remote and local memory, respectively, compared to the previous generation. Memory footprint over 1.5 TiB/socket is now supported. The Intel Xeon Scalable processor cores feature the new Intel AVX-512 instruction set, support higher clock frequencies in select CPU models and contains numerous architectural improvements.
  • Storage technology: Colfax’s offerings will be enhanced with performance-boosting Intel solid-state drives (SSDs), including the drives with the new Intel Optane technology. This breakthrough storage solution uses the 3D XPoint memory to provide non-volatile data storage with performance and longevity previously found only in volatile memory: over 5x faster than PCIe SSDs and 60x faster than SATA SSDs (Aerospike DB).
  • High-performance networking: The new servers offered by Colfax feature optional integrated Intel Omni-Path Fabric 100, which offers the same 100 Gbps bandwidth and sub-microsecond latency for high-performance networking as its discrete card implementation, only at a lower cost, lower power consumption and without the loss of PCIe lanes. The fabric is built from the ground up with the datacenter in mind, and as a consequence, its reliability features and scalability are prominent from small-scale to large-scale installations. As an alternative, multi-port 10 GbE network support offers high-performance networking with minimal impact on the datacenter software and infrastructure, making it a proven “it just works” solution.
  • Heterogeneous accelerated computing: For applications with the greatest performance needs, Colfax’s new solution portfolio offers optional integrated, discrete, or on-chip Intel QuickAssist technology accelerates cryptography, public key and compression/decompression functions, freeing up the CPU for computation. This technology is particularly useful for secure server multi-tenancy, encrypted transfers, compressed storage facilitation and data analytics.

“Today’s announcement brings an extensive and beneficial overhaul to the server platform and adds a more scalable and balanced solution for all our customers,” said Gautam Shah, President and CEO at Colfax. “The new platform features architectural enhancements, including a greater core count and larger memory capacity; it also takes advantage of novel technologies such as the latest Intel AVX-512 instruction set for fast floating-point arithmetic, Intel QuickAssist Technology for cryptography and compression, and integrated Intel Omni-Path fabric for clustering.”

For the end user, this means they will be able to get faster application response time, greater throughput and lower costs of energy, rack space, hardware and software licenses. The new architecture is designed for the widest range of application domains, including computing, virtualization, encryption and data analytics. It will have faster arithmetic, higher-bandwidth network connections, and better memory performance. The Intel Xeon Scalable platform will support a new, comprehensive set of adjacent products in storage, accelerators and connectivity.

Over the past 20 years, Colfax has enjoyed a close working relationship with Intel, which allows the company to stay at the forefront of technology changes. Colfax is committed to this relationship and plans to continue this well into the future.

For more information on Intel Xeon scalable processor-based products offered by Colfax, please visit http://www.colfax-intl.com/nd/servers/Xeon-Scalable.aspx

About Colfax International

Colfax International is a global provider of customized workstations, servers, clusters, storage and personal supercomputing solutions. Founded in 1987, Colfax International is based in Sunnyvale, California and is privately held. For more information, please visit www.colfax-intl.com.

Source: Colfax

The post Colfax Announces Support for Intel Xeon Scalable Processors appeared first on HPCwire.

Cray Adds Intel Xeon Scalable Processors to Cray Supercomputers

Tue, 07/11/2017 - 11:11

SEATTLE, July 11, 2017 — Global supercomputer leader Cray Inc. (Nasdaq:CRAY) today announced the Cray XC50 supercomputers and the Cray CS line of cluster supercomputers will be available with the new Intel Xeon Scalable processors. With increased performance and advancements in reliability and serviceability, the new Intel Xeon processors are powerful building blocks in providing Cray XC50 and Cray CS customers with flexible, integrated, and high-performing supercomputing platforms.

“Our customers are at the forefront of running highly-complex analytics, simulation, and AI workloads,” said Fred Kohout, Cray’s senior vice president of products and chief marketing officer. “Adding the new Intel Xeon Scalable processors to our industry-leading supercomputers and cluster systems provides a world-class pairing of innovative supercomputing technologies and advanced processors for achieving breakthrough results.”

“The new Intel Xeon Scalable processors deliver the enhanced performance, memory bandwidth and I/O flexibility demanded by a wide range of scientific and commercial applications,” said Trish Damkroger, Vice President of Technical Computing at Intel. “The combination of Cray supercomputers and Intel Xeon Scalable processors will continue to enable researchers and scientists to achieve breakthrough innovations and discoveries.”

The Cray XC50 supercomputers with the new Intel Xeon Scalable processors are available now. The Cray CS500 cluster supercomputers and the Cray CS-Storm accelerated cluster supercomputers with the new Intel Xeon processors will be available in the third quarter of 2017.

The Cray XC50 supercomputers are designed to handle the most challenging workloads requiring sustained multi-petaflop performance. They incorporate the Aries high performance network interconnect for low latency and scalable global bandwidth, as well as the latest Intel Xeon Scalable processors, Intel Xeon Phi processors, and NVIDIA Tesla GPU accelerators. With a top peak performance of 500 petaflops, and one petaflops in a single cabinet, the Cray XC50 supercomputer delivers on Cray’s commitment to performance supercomputing with an architecture and software environment that provides extreme scalability and sustained performance.

The Cray CS500 cluster supercomputers are industry-standards-based, highly customizable, and expressly designed to handle the most demanding range of simulation, research, analytics, and machine learning problems at scale. Cray CS500 systems provide flexible node configurations featuring the latest processor and interconnect technologies giving customers the ability to tailor a system to specific needs — from an all-purpose high-performance computing cluster to an accelerated system configured for shared memory, large memory, or accelerator-based tasks.

The Cray CS-Storm accelerated cluster supercomputers – the Cray CS-Storm 500GT and the Cray CS-Storm 500NX – are purpose built for the most demanding artificial intelligence (AI) workloads. The systems provide customers with powerful, accelerator-optimized solutions for running machine learning and deep learning applications. Delivered as a fully integrated cluster supercomputer, the Cray CS-Storm systems include the Cray Programming Environment, Cray Sonexion scale out storage, and full cluster systems management.

For more information on the Cray XC supercomputers, the Cray CS series of cluster supercomputers, and Cray CS-Storm accelerated cluster supercomputers please visit the Cray website at www.cray.com.

About Cray Inc.

Global supercomputing leader Cray Inc. (Nasdaq:CRAY) provides innovative systems and solutions enabling scientists and engineers in industry, academia and government to meet existing and future simulation and analytics challenges. Leveraging more than 40 years of experience in developing and servicing the world’s most advanced supercomputers, Cray offers a comprehensive portfolio of supercomputers and big data storage and analytics solutions delivering unrivaled performance, efficiency and scalability. Cray’s Adaptive Supercomputing vision is focused on delivering innovative next-generation products that integrate diverse processing technologies into a unified architecture, allowing customers to meet the market’s continued demand for realized performance. Go to www.cray.com for more information.

Source: Cray

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Intel Unveils Xeon Scalable Processors

Tue, 07/11/2017 - 11:06

SANTA CLARA, Calif., July 11, 2017 – Intel today launched its new Intel Xeon Scalable processors, providing businesses with breakthrough performance to handle compute-hungry tasks including real-time analytics, virtualized infrastructure and high-performance computing. Today’s launch marks the greatest set of data center and network processor advancements in a decade.

“Data center and network infrastructure is undergoing massive transformations to support emerging use cases like precision medicine, artificial intelligence and agile network services paving the path to 5G,” said Navin Shenoy, executive vice president and general manager of the Intel Data Center Group. “Intel Xeon Scalable processors represent the biggest data center advancement in a decade.”

Editorial: The Intel Xeon Scalable – a Truly Big Day for the Data Center
Press Kit: Intel Xeon Processor Scalable Family

Today’s general availability announcement follows Intel’s largest data center early ship program with more than 500,000 Intel Xeon Scalable processors already sold to leading enterprise, high-performance computing, cloud and communication services provider customers. Customers will benefit from a dramatic performance increase of 1.65x on average over previous generation technology. With 58 world records and counting, Intel Xeon Scalable delivers industry leading performance across the broadest range of workloads.

Intel Xeon Scalable processors also provide businesses with the richest suite of platform feature innovations that deliver significant performance increases across key workloads. These include:

  • Artificial Intelligence: Delivers 2.2x higher deep learning training and inference compared to the previous generation, and 113x deep learning performance gains compared to a 3-year-old non-optimized server system when combined with software optimizations speeding delivery of AI-fueled services.
  • Networking: Delivers up to 2.5x increased IPSec forwarding rate for key networking applications compared to previous generation when using Intel QuickAssist and DPDK increasing the value derived from network transformation.
  • Virtualization: Operates up to an estimated 4.2x more virtual machines (VMs) versus a 4-year-old system for rapid service deployment, server utilization, lower energy costs and space efficiency spurring enterprise data center modernization.
  • High Performance ComputingProvides up to a 2x FLOPs/clock improvement with Intel AVX-512 as well as integrated Intel Omni-Path Architecture ports, delivering improved compute capability, I/O flexibility and memory bandwidth to accelerate discovery and innovation.
  • Storage: Processes up to 5x more IOPS while reducing latency by up to 70 percent versus out-of-the-box NVMe SSDs when combined with Intel Optane SSDs and Storage Performance Development Kit (SPDK), making data more accessible for advanced analytics.

The Intel Xeon Scalable processor features a new core microarchitecture, new on-die interconnects and memory controllers. The resulting platform optimizes performance as well as the reliability, security and manageability necessary in data centers and networking infrastructure.

  • Performance: The Intel Xeon Scalable processors deliver an overall performance increase up to 1.65x versus the previous generation, and up to 5x OLTP warehouse workloads versus the current install base—accelerating today’s modern-day workloads including modeling and simulation, machine learning, HPC and digital content creation. These significant performance gains are enabled through new features such as Intel Advanced Vector Extensions 512 (Intel AVX-512), which boost performance of computationally intensive tasks, a new Intel Mesh Architecture for reduced system latency, Intel QuickAssist Technology for hardware acceleration of cryptography and data compression operations and integrated high-speed fabric with Intel Omni-Path Architecture for cost-effective deployment of HPC clusters.
  • Scalability: Optimized to meet the wide range of performance demands in data centers and communications networks, the Intel Xeon Scalable processors offer up to 28 cores and up to 6 terabytes of system memory (4-socket systems), and scale to support 2-socket through 8-socket systems and beyond, powering entry-level workloads to the most mission-critical applications.
  • Agility: Compute, network and storage performance and software ecosystem optimizations of the Intel Xeon Scalable processors make it ideal for software defined, TCO (total cost of ownership)-optimized, data centers that dynamically self-provision resources — on premise, through the network, and in the cloud — based on workload needs.
  • Security without Compromise: Data protection through full encryption has long carried a significant performance overhead. Application can now run with less than 1 percent overhead with data-at-rest encryption turned on. The new Intel Xeon Scalable processor also delivers a 3.1x performance improvement generation-over-generation in cryptography performance. Intel has extended processor security features with Intel Key Protection Technology delivering enhanced protection to security key attacks. In addition Intel Xeon Scalable is designed to secure the platform with further advancements in hardware root of trust.

Foundation for Next-Generation Data Centers and Communications Networks

Intel also introduced Intel Select Solutions, a solutions brand aimed at simplifying and speeding the deployment of data center and network infrastructure, with initial solutions delivery on Canonical Ubuntu, Microsoft SQL 16 and VMware vSAN 6.6. Intel Select Solutions is an expansion of the company’s deep investment in Intel Builders ecosystem collaborations and will deliver a choice of Intel-verified configurations to the market, enabling customers to speed return on investment in Intel Xeon Scalable processor-based infrastructure for user-prioritized workloads.

Uniquely architected to help customers accelerate the deployment of cloud infrastructure, transform communications networks and unleash artificial intelligence, the Intel Xeon Scalable platform is supported by 100s of ecosystem of partners, more than 480 Intel builders and more than 7,000 software vendors to drive software optimizations that take advantage of the platform. The Intel Xeon Scalable processor has received broad support from a variety of companies, including Amazon, AT&T, BBVA, Google, Microsoft, Montefiore, Technicolor and Telefonica.

Learn more about the innovations Intel is bringing to the data center with the new Intel Xeon Scalable processors, Intel Select Solutions, by visiting www.intel.com/xeonscalable, or visit http://launchevent.intel.com to experience a deep dive into the platform.

Source: Intel

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Exxact Introduces Quantum Servers Featuring Xeon Scalable Processors

Tue, 07/11/2017 - 10:15

FREMONT, Calif., July 11, 2017 — Exxact Corporation, a provider of high performance computing solutions for AI and deep learning research, today announced the planned production of their new Quantum series of servers featuring the new Intel Xeon Scalable processors.

The Intel Xeon Scalable platform has been specially designed to deliver advanced HPC capabilities. Data scientists and researchers looking to unlock faster insights from data and accelerate product innovation will benefit from its advancements across compute, storage, memory and I/O, which represent a significant leap forward in the performance and efficiency of cutting-edge HPC systems.

“The Intel Xeon Scalable processors provide a new foundation for delivering workload-optimized performance for HPC, storage, and networking.” said Andrew Nelson, Director of Engineering at Exxact. “With its architectural flexibility, the Intel Xeon Scalable platform will flourish across common applications and prove to be a valuable platform for emerging workloads such as deep learning.”

Exxact will offer various Intel Xeon Scalable processor-based solutions including the following Quantum servers:

All three featured Quantum servers are designed with Intel Server Boards that are optimized for the performance, scalability and hardware-enhanced resiliency enhancements in the Intel Xeon Scalable processors. From density-optimized boards enabling high memory and processing performance, to versatile boards that support maximum capacity and I/O flexibility, Intel Server Boards are capable of handling the high demands of today’s HPC workloads. These featured systems support a number of key processor enhancements including:

  • Intel QuickAssist Technology (Intel QAT), which delivers up to 100Gbps performance for data protection encryption and public key authentication functions plus data compression/decompression workloads, while freeing up CPU cycles for other high impact demands on the server.
  • Intel Omni-Path Architecture integration, delivering 100Gbps port bandwidth fabric for improved performance and lower latency in medium to large clusters.
  • Integrated Intel 10G Ethernet with RDMA, which eliminates TCP/IP overhead by offloading transport to NIC for faster switching and packet filtering

Exxact Quantum servers are ideal for HPC workloads including AI/deep learning, parallel computing, life sciences, genomic sequencing, computational fluid dynamics, and seismic modeling. Common use cases for Exxact Quantum servers include data analytics requiring high compute power, HPC with real-time compute requirements, databases requiring optimal compute to storage ratio, cloud infrastructure with compute intense requirements, and more.

Exxact Quantum series of servers featuring the new Intel Xeon Scalable processors are now available for order. For more information, please contact the Exxact Sales Department here: https://exxactcorp.com/index.php/company/prod_list/3

About Exxact Corporation

Exxact develops and manufactures innovative computing platforms and solutions that include workstation, server, cluster, and storage products developed for Life Sciences, HPC, Big Data, Cloud, Visualization, Video Wall, and AV applications. With a full range of engineering and logistics services, including consultancy, initial solution validation, manufacturing, implementation, and support, Exxact enables their customers to solve complex computing challenges, meet product development deadlines, improve resource utilization, reduce energy consumption, and maintain a competitive edge. Visit Exxact Corporation at www.exxactcorp.com.

Source: Exxact

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DARPA Selects Five Teams for Neural Engineering Program

Mon, 07/10/2017 - 14:06

Interfacing directly with the human neural system to promote health and expand human capacities is an ongoing goal in brain research. Today, the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) announced five contracts has been issued in support of it Neural Engineering System Design (NESD) program announced last year. The list of winners is below.

NESD’s formal goal is development of an “implantable system able to provide precision communication between the brain and the digital world. Such an interface would convert the electrochemical signaling used by neurons in the brain into the ones and zeros that constitute the language of information technology, and do so at far greater scale than is currently possible.” The work has the potential to significantly advance scientists’ understanding of the neural underpinnings of vision, hearing, and speech and could eventually lead to new treatments for people living with sensory deficits.

“The NESD program looks ahead to a future in which advanced neural devices offer improved fidelity, resolution, and precision sensory interface for therapeutic applications,” said Phillip Alvelda, the founding NESD Program Manager. “By increasing the capacity of advanced neural interfaces to engage more than one million neurons in parallel, NESD aims to enable rich two-way communication with the brain at a scale that will help deepen our understanding of that organ’s underlying biology, complexity, and function.”

Not surprisingly, the project is necessarily a cross-disciplinary. Among the many disciplines represented in the teams are neuroscience, low-power electronics, photonics, medical device packaging and manufacturing, systems engineering, mathematics, computer science, and wireless communications. In addition to overcoming engineering-oriented hardware, biocompatibility, and communication challenges, the teams must also develop advanced mathematical and neuro-computation techniques to decode and encode neural data and compress those troves of information so they are tractable within the available bandwidth and power constraints.

Here’s a brief snapshot of the teams chosen and the focus of their work (for additional details, refer to the NESD factsheet):

  • Brown University team led by Dr. Arto Nurmikko will seek to decode neural processing of speech, focusing on the tone and vocalization aspects of auditory perception. The team’s proposed interface would be composed of networks of up to 100,000 untethered, submillimeter-sized “neurograin” sensors implanted onto or into the cerebral cortex. A separate RF unit worn or implanted as a flexible electronic patch would passively power the neurograins and serve as the hub for relaying data to and from an external command center that transcodes and processes neural and digital signals.
  • Columbia University team led by Dr. Ken Shepard will study vision and aims to develop a non-penetrating bioelectric interface to the visual cortex. The team envisions layering over the cortex a single, flexible complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) integrated circuit containing an integrated electrode array. A relay station transceiver worn on the head would wirelessly power and communicate with the implanted device.
  • Fondation Voir et Entendre team led by Drs. Jose-Alain Sahel and Serge Picaud will study vision. The team aims to apply techniques from the field of optogenetics to enable communication between neurons in the visual cortex and a camera-based, high-definition artificial retina worn over the eyes, facilitated by a system of implanted electronics and micro-LED optical technology.
  • John B. Pierce Laboratory team led by Dr. Vincent Pieribone will study vision. The team will pursue an interface system in which modified neurons capable of bioluminescence and responsive to optogenetic stimulation communicate with an all-optical prosthesis for the visual cortex.
  • Paradromics, Inc., team led by Dr. Matthew Angle aims to create a high-data-rate cortical interface using large arrays of penetrating microwire electrodes for high-resolution recording and stimulation of neurons. As part of the NESD program, the team will seek to build an implantable device to support speech restoration. Paradromics’ microwire array technology exploits the reliability of traditional wire electrodes, but by bonding these wires to specialized CMOS electronics the team seeks to overcome the scalability and bandwidth limitations of previous approaches using wire electrodes.
  • University of California, Berkeley, team led by Dr. Ehud Isacoff aims to develop a novel “light field” holographic microscope that can detect and modulate the activity of up to a million neurons in the cerebral cortex. The team will attempt to create quantitative encoding models to predict the responses of neurons to external visual and tactile stimuli, and then apply those predictions to structure photo-stimulation patterns that elicit sensory percepts in the visual or somatosensory cortices, where the device could replace lost vision or serve as a brain-machine interface for control of an artificial limb.

DARPA structured the NESD program to facilitate commercial transition of successful technologies. Key to ensuring a smooth path to practical applications, teams will have access to design assistance, rapid prototyping, and fabrication services provided by industry partners whose participation as facilitators was organized by DARPA and who will operate as sub-contractors to the teams.

Link to DARPA post: http://www.darpa.mil/news-events/2017-07-10

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Europe Sets Sept. Date to Discuss Supercomputer Requirements

Mon, 07/10/2017 - 10:24

Europe will take another step towards developing and deploying pre-exascale systems in September when four European supercomputing centers and vendors gather at an Open Dialogue Event to discuss systems requirements and gather market feedback. The meeting, announced last week and scheduled for September 6 in Brussels, is part of the Europe’s Public Procurement of Innovative Solutions for High-Performance Computing (PPI4HPC) project.

The four public procurers include Barcelona Supercomputing Center (Spain)), CINECA (Italy), Jülich Supercomputing Centre (Germany) and GENCI (France). They are working together in a joint procurement process which is being characterized as “a first in the area of high-performance computing (HPC).” The total investment planned will be about € 73 million.

“The aim is for each public procurer to buy an innovative, high-performance supercomputer and/or innovative high-performance storage system that will be integrated into their computing centre. These systems are expected to be deployed in the 2019-2021 timeframe.” The systems are expected to accommodate a wide range of applications, including traditional HPC applications, HPDA and AI. They are also expected to be used for common innovation topics in the EU community.

Here’s a brief description of PPI4HPC’s goal and process taken from its launch announcement last April.

“The Public Procurement of Innovative Solutions for High-Performance Computing (PPI4HPC) gathers the leading European supercomputing centres as a buyers group to execute a joint Public Procurement of Innovative Solutions (PPI) in the area of high-performance computing (HPC). The participants will work together on coordinated roadmaps for providing HPC resources optimised to the needs of European scientists and engineers. The final decision on which innovative solutions will be procured at the different sites will be made following these roadmaps, but remain a decision of the individual sites.

“For the first time in Europe, a joint European procurement of innovative HPC systems, performed by a consortium of hosting members and hosting centres of the PRACE e-Infrastructure – a world-class environment capable of achieving global leadership. In order to address major scientific, industrial and societal challenges, and to maintain Europe competitiveness within a global race involving USA, China, and Japan the European Commission has implemented a vision towards the establishment of a strong and competitive HPC integrated ecosystem in Europe.”

The upcoming September Open Dialogue Event is open all interested suppliers with a maximum of two representatives by company.

Link to the press release: https://ppi4hpc.eu/news/leading-european-supercomputing-centres-join-forces-procurement-process-innovative-hpc-systems

Link to PPI4HPC site: https://ppi4hpc.eu

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UT Medical Branch Explores DNA Folding with TACC Supercomputers

Fri, 07/07/2017 - 09:49

AUSTIN, July 7, 2017 — A biological mystery lies at the center of each of our cells, namely: how one meter of DNA can be wadded up into the space of a micron (or one millionth of a meter) within each nucleus of our body.

The nuclei of human cells are not even the most crowded biological place that we know of. Some bactiophages — viruses that infect and replicate within a bacterium — have even more concentrated DNA.

“How does it get in there?” B. Montgomery (Monte) Pettitt, a biochemist and professor at the University of Texas Medical Branch, asks. “It’s a charged polymer. How does it overcome the repulsion at its liquid crystalline density? How much order and disorder is allowed, and how does this play a role in nucleic acids?”

Mean-field sequence-specific twist-induced kinked elastic configurations, as shown above, were generated through molecular dynamics simulations on TACC’s supercomputers. [Credit: B. Montgomery Pettitt and Christopher Myers]Using the Stampede and Lonestar5 supercomputers at The University of Texas at Austin’s Texas Advanced Computing Center (TACC), Pettitt investigates how phages’ DNA folds into hyper-confined spaces.

Writing in the June 2017 issue of the Journal of Computational Chemistry, he explained how DNA may overcome both electrostatic repulsion and its natural stiffness.

The key to doing so? Kinks.

The introduction of sharp twists or curves into configurations of DNA packaged within a spherical envelope significantly reduces the overall energies and pressures of the molecule, according to Pettitt.

He and his collaborators used a model that deforms and kinks the DNA every 24 base pairs, which is close to the average length that is predicted from the phage’s DNA sequence. The introduction of such persistent defects not only reduces the total bending energy of confined DNA, but also reduces the electrostatic component of the energy and pressure.

“We show that a broad ensemble of polymer configurations is consistent with the structural data,” he and collaborator Christopher Myers, also of University of Texas Medical Branch, wrote.

Insights like these cannot be gained strictly in the lab. They require supercomputers that serve as molecular microscopes, charting the movement of atoms and atomic bonds at length- and time-scales that are not feasible to study with physical experiments alone.

“In the field of molecular biology, there’s a wonderful interplay between theory, experiment and simulation,” Pettitt said. “We take parameters of experiments and see if they agree with the simulations and theories. This becomes the scientific method for how we now advance our hypotheses.”

The images above show the average density distributions over 21 DNA configurations each simulated for 100 nanoseconds of molecular dynamics after minimization using a) fully elastic and b) kinked configurations, for comparison to c) Cryo-EM density map from asymmetric phage reconstructions of P22 with capsid density graphically removed. [Credit: B. Montgomery Pettitt and Christopher Myers]Problems like the ones Pettitt is interested in cannot be solved on a desktop computer or a typical campus cluster, but require hundreds of computer processors working in parallel to mimic the minute movements and physical forces of molecules in a cell.

Pettitt is able to access TACC’s supercomputers in part because of a unique program known as the University of Texas Research Cyberinfrastructure (UTRC) initiative, which makes TACC’s computing resources, expertise and training available to researchers within the University of Texas Systems’ 14 institutions.

“Computational research, like that of Dr. Pettitt, which seeks to bridge our understanding of physical, chemical, and ultimately biological phenomena, involves so many calculations that it’s only really approachable on large supercomputers like TACC’s Stampede or Lonestar5 systems,” said Brian Beck, a life sciences researcher at TACC.

“Having TACC supercomputing resources available is critical to this style of research,” Pettitt said.

Finding the Order in Disordered Proteins

Another phenomenon that has long interested Pettitt is the behavior of Intrinsically Disordered Proteins (IDPs) and intrinsically disordered domains, where parts of a protein have a disordered shape.

Unlike crystals or the highly-packed DNA in viruses, which have distinct, rigid shapes, IDPs “fold up into a gooey mess,” according to Pettitt. And yet they’re critical for all forms of life.

It is believed that in eukaryotes (organisms whose cells have complex substructures like nuclei), roughly 30 percent of proteins have an intrinsically disordered domain. More than 60 percent of proteins involved in cell signaling (molecular processes that take signals from outside the cell or across cells that tell the cell what behaviors to turn on and off in response) have disordered domains. Similarly, 80 percent of cancer-related signaling proteins have IDP regions – making them important molecules to understand.

Among the IDPs Pettitt and his group are studying are nuclear transcription factors. These molecules control the expression of genes and have a signaling domain that is rich in the flexible amino acid, glycine.

The folding of the nuclear transcription factor signaling domain is not brought about by hydrogen bonding and hydrophobic effects, like most protein molecules, according to Pettitt. Rather, when the longer molecules find too many glycines in a space, they go beyond their solubility and start associating with each other in unusual ways.

“It’s like adding too much sugar in your tea,” Pettitt explains. “It won’t get any sweeter. The sugar must fall out of solution and find a partner – precipitating into a lump.”

Writing in Protein Science in 2015, he described molecular simulations performed on Stampede that helped to explain how and why IDPs collapse into globule-like structures.

The simulations calculated the forces from carbonyl (CO) dipole-dipole interactions — attractions between the positive end of one polar molecule and the negative end of another polar molecule. He determined that these interactions are more important in the collapse and aggregation of long strands of glycine than the formation of H-bonds.

“Given that the backbone is a feature of all proteins, CO interactions may also play a role in proteins of nontrivial sequence where structure is eventually determined by interior packing and the stabilizing effects of H-bonds and CO–CO interactions,” he concluded.

The research was enabled by an allocation of compute time on Stampede through the Extreme Science and Engineering Discovery Environment (XSEDE) which is supported by the National Science Foundation.

Pettitt, a long-time champion of supercomputing, doesn’t only use TACC resources himself. He encourages other scholars, including his colleagues at the Sealy Center for Structural Biology and Molecular Biophysics, to use supercomputers as well.

“Advanced computing is important for data analysis and data refinement from experiments, X-ray and electron microscopy, and informatics,” he says. “All of these problems have big data processing issues that can be addressed using advanced computing.”

When it comes to uncovering the mysteries of biology on the tiniest scales, nothing quite beats a giant supercomputer.

[Pettitt’s research is supported by grants from the National Institutes of Health, the National Science Foundation and the Robert A. Welch Foundation. The Stampede and Lonestar5 supercomputers at the Texas Advanced Computing Center are supported by awards from the National Science Foundation and the University of Texas System.]

Source: Aaron Dubrow, TACC

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400Gb Open Ethernet Switch from Mellanox

Thu, 07/06/2017 - 11:41

Mellanox (NASDAQ: MLNX) today announced Spectrum-2, billed by the interconnect company as the most scalable 200 and 400GB/second Open Ethernet switch, offering 10X scalability while reducing datacenter OPEX via 1.3 times better power efficiency.

Spectrum-2 provides Ethernet connectivity for up to 16 ports of 400GbE, 32 ports of 200GbE, 64 ports of 100GbE and 128 ports of 50GbE and 25GbE, and enables, according to Mellanox, port density designed to build switch platforms for cloud, hyperscale, enterprise datacenter, big data, artificial intelligence, financial and storage, among other applications.

Gilad Shainer, vice president of marketing at Mellanox, told HPCwire last week that while the company has already announced adapter and cabling products for 200GB/sec Open Ethernet performance, Spectrum-2 fulfills the third required “missing element” for an end-to-end solution, the switch. He said the new product is an important piece in Mellanox’s support for Open Ethernet, which Shainer described as an open standard “approach that enables customers to choose their switch vendors and software vendors irrespective of one another.”

Spectrum-2 includes a flexible parser and packet modifier, which can be programmed to process upcoming types of protocols, “thereby future proofing the datacenter,” the company said.

“Data Center customers are looking to significantly increase the Ethernet switch bandwidth in their networks while simultaneously raising the levels of programmability and visibility,” said Seamus Crehan, president of analyst firm Crehan Research. “The Spectrum-2 switch from Mellanox not only addresses these needs, but does so with a cost-effective Open Ethernet solution.”

Mellanox said Spectrum-2 is the first 400G and 200G Ethernet switch that provides adaptive routing and load balancing combined that is backed, the company said, by guarantees for zero packet loss and port performance. “The solution also doubles data capacity while providing the lowest latency (300 nanoseconds), 1.4 times lower than alternative offerings,” Mellanox said in its prepared announcement.”

“Enterprise adoption of off-premises cloud services in conjunction with adoption of data driven computation using AI techniques and machine learning (Ml) are some of the key drivers for 200GE and 400GE networking in the data center,” said Cliff Grossner, research director and advisor, Data Center Research Practice at UK-based IHS Markit. “In addition to speed, the rapid pace of innovation in cloud service provider datacenters demands a programmable network where new protocols can be introduced without changing switch hardware.”

Grossner said a recent IHS Markit study showed that off-premises cloud service revenue is expected to reach $343 billion in 2021, up from $126 billion in 2016, driving the need for high speed and power efficient programmable networking.

Spectrum-2 extends the capabilities of the first generation of Spectrum, which Mellanox said has been deployed in thousands of datacenters. Spectrum supports 10G infrastructures and higher while enabling migration to 25G, 50G and 100G speeds. Spectrum-2 maintains the same API as Spectrum, according to the company, for porting software onto the ASIC via the Open SDK/SAI API or Linux upstream driver (Switchdev), and supports standard network operating systems and interfaces, including Cumulus Linux, SONIC, standard Linux distributions and more.

Spectrum-2 also supports an extensive set of telemetry capabilities, including in-band network telemetry standard, for network monitoring and diagnostics visibility.

“In the world of networking, capacity is king, and Mellanox does it again with Spectrum-2, pushing the limits on port speeds, densities, packet buffer size, and functionality,” said J.R. Rivers, co-founder and CTO of Cumulus Networks. “Our customers are on the forefront of applying web-scale principles in their datacenters, and Spectrum-2 enables our customers to build high performance networks that leverage programmability capabilities and leading edge telemetry-based fabric validation.”

Mellanox said Spectrum-2 SDK is available now for early-access. The Spectrum-2 switch ASIC is expected to be available later this year.

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setek Receives Follow-on Order From Penguin Computing

Thu, 07/06/2017 - 10:30

AALBORG, Denmark, July 06, 2017 — Asetek today announced a further order from Penguin Computing, an established data center OEM, for an undisclosed HPC (High Performance Computing) installation.

On Friday 23 June, Asetek and Penguin Computing announced that Asetek was selected to provide liquid cooling  for NVIDIA’s P100 GPU accelerators, the most advanced GPUs yet produced by NVIDIA, as part of Penguin’s Tundra ES (Extreme Scale) platform. Penguin made a follow-on order shortly after for a second installation.

Today’s follow-on order is for Asetek’s RackCDU Direct-to-Chip (D2C) liquid cooling solution and includes additional loops to cool NVIDIA’s P100 GPU accelerators at a third installation.

The order has a value of USD 30,000 with delivery to be completed in Q3 2017.

Asetek signed a global purchasing agreement with Penguin Computing in 2015.

Source: Asetek

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Mellanox Introduces Spectrum-2 Open Ethernet Switch

Thu, 07/06/2017 - 08:27

SUNNYVALE, Calif. & YOKNEAM, Israel, July 6, 2017 — Mellanox Technologies, Ltd. (NASDAQ: MLNX), supplier of high-performance, end-to-end smart interconnect solutions for data center servers and storage systems, today announced the Spectrum-2, the world’s most scalable 200 gigabit and 400 gigabit Open Ethernet switch solution. Spectrum-2 is designed to set new records of data center scalability, more than 10 times higher than market competitors, and reduces data center operational costs by delivering 1.3 times better power efficiency. Moreover, Spectrum-2 provides new levels of programmability and optimizes routing capabilities for building the most efficient Ethernet-based compute and storage infrastructures.

Spectrum-2 provides industry-leading Ethernet connectivity for up to 16 ports of 400GbE, 32 ports of 200GbE, 64 ports of 100GbE and 128 ports of 50GbE and 25GbE, and enables a rich set of enhancements, including increased flexibility and port density, to build a variety of switch platforms optimized for cloud, Hyperscale, Enterprise data center, big data, artificial intelligence, financial, storage and more applications.

Spectrum-2’s innovative design provides IT managers the capability to fully optimize their network for specific customer requirements, and to maximize their data center return on investment. Moreover, Spectrum-2 delivers unmatched power efficiency when compared to alternative offerings, improving data center total cost of ownership. The solution implements a complete set of the network protocols within the switch ASIC in the most efficient way, providing users with all the functionality needed, out-of-box. Additionally, Spectrum-2 includes a flexible parser and packet modifier which can be programmed to process new types of future protocols, thereby future proofing the data center.

“Data Center customers are looking to significantly increase the Ethernet switch bandwidth in their networks while simultaneously raising the levels of programmability and visibility,” said Seamus Crehan, President, Crehan Research. “The Spectrum-2 switch from Mellanox not only addresses these needs, but does so with a cost-effective Open Ethernet solution.”

“Enterprise adoption of off-premises cloud services in conjunction with adoption of data driven computation using artificial intelligence (AI) techniques and machine learning (Ml) are some of the key drivers for 200GE and 400GE networking in the data center. In addition to speed, the rapid pace of innovation in cloud service provider data centers demands a programmable network where new protocols can be introduced without changing switch hardware,” said Cliff Grossner, Ph.D., research director and advisor, Data Center Research Practice, IHS Markit. “In a recent IHS Markit report, we learnt that off-premises cloud service revenue is expected to hit $343 billion in 2021, up from 126 billion in 2016; this will drive the need for high speed and power efficient programmable networking.”

“Spectrum-2 Open Ethernet switch enables our customers and partners to meet the voracious demands of data speed, data processing and real time data analytics, and to gain competitive advantages,” said Gilad Shainer, vice president of marketing at Mellanox Technologies. “With 10 times better scalability, 1.3 times better power efficiency, full programmability and flexibility, and the capability to seamlessly migrate to 200G and 400G data speeds, Spectrum-2 provides data centers with the ability to maximize return on investment and future proof their investment.”

Spectrum-2 is the first 400G and 200G Ethernet switch that provides adaptive routing and load balancing while guaranteeing Zero Packet Loss and Unconditional Port Performance. These capabilities enable predictable and highest network performance. The solution also doubles data capacity while providing the lowest latency (300 nanoseconds), 1.4 times lower than alternative offerings. Furthermore, Spectrum-2 is the ideal foundation for Ethernet storage fabrics to connect the next generation of high performance Flash based storage platforms, and combines cloud agility and scalability with enterprise reliability.

Spectrum-2 extends the capabilities of the first generation of Spectrum, which is deployed in thousands of data centers around the world. Spectrum enables IT managers to achieve leading performance and efficiency for 10G infrastructures and higher, and to effectively and economically migrate from 10G to 25G, 50G and 100G speeds. Spectrum capabilities were highlighted in a Tolly test report which demonstrated superior performance versus competitor products. Spectrum-2 maintains the same API as Spectrum, for porting software onto the ASIC via the Open SDK/SAI API or Linux upstream driver (Switchdev), and supports all of the standard network operating systems and interfaces including Cumulus Linux, SONIC, standard Linux distributions and more.

Spectrum-2 also supports an extensive set of telemetry capabilities, including the latest in-band network telemetry standard, which provide operators with full visibility into their network and allow them to monitor, diagnose and analyze every aspect of operations. This greatly simplifies data center management and enables IT managers to fully optimize the network to their data center application’s needs.

Industry Quotes:

“Our relationship with Mellanox crosses interconnect technologies and allows us to stay ahead of the market in terms of innovation and propels our portfolio evolution,” said Mr. Liu Ning, Deputy Director of Baidu SYS department. “We are looking forward to seeing Mellanox’s new generation switch product, Spectrum-2, come to market.”

“In the world of networking, capacity is king, and Mellanox does it again with Spectrum-2, pushing the limits on port speeds, densities, packet buffer size, and functionality,” said JR Rivers, Co-Founder & Chief Technology Officer, Cumulus Networks. “Our customers are on the forefront of applying web-scale principles in their data centers, and Spectrum-2 enables our customers to build high performance networks that leverages programmability capabilities and leading edge telemetry-based fabric validation.”

“Deploying scalable, reliable, and simple data management is core to our storage solutions that offer enterprise reliability, cloud scalability, efficiency, and performance,” said Marty Lans, Sr. Director Storage Connectivity and Ecosystem Engineering at Hewlett Packard Enterprise. “Spectrum-2 offers the performance, scalability, and reliability required in a storage fabric that underpins next generation storage architectures.”

“We are pleased to see Mellanox innovating with Spectrum-2,” Li Li, SVP, General Manager of Product Sales and Marketing at New H3C Group. “As the industry migrates to 200 gigabit and beyond, we are seeking new levels of programmability along with significant performance enhancements. Spectrum-2 holds the promise of providing the best of both worlds.”

“The exponential growth of data as organizations embrace cognitive computing and artificial intelligence requires faster and more scalable network infrastructures,” said Bryan Talik, director, IBM OpenPOWER System Enablement. “The Mellanox Spectrum-2 enables IBM to deliver better scalability and network optimization for OpenPOWER systems.”

“We are strongly focused on maximizing our data center ROI,” said Mr. Leijun Hu, VP of Inspur Group. “With Mellanox’s new Spectrum-2, we can see a clear path to 200 gigabit and beyond with impressive scalability and unmatched power efficiency. Spectrum-2 has a rich feature set that will also allow us to fully optimize our network to suit our specific needs which is critical to addressing our expanding business needs.”

“The increase in data volume and the need to support more users require faster network speeds and higher scalability,” Tao Liu, VP, at Kingsoft Cloud. “Mellanox Ethernet solutions empower our cloud infrastructure today and we look forward to using the advanced capabilities of Spectrum-2.”

“Mellanox Open Ethernet Spectrum and the upcoming Spectrum-2 switches enable to optimize industry wide data centers for best performance and efficiency,” said Yuval Bachar, Principal Engineer, Global Infrastructure Architecture and Strategy at LinkedIn. “The industry need for the exponential data center and edge growth requires to build a scalable and robust infrastructure. The Mellanox solution will enable this growth, offering robust feature-set and capabilities.”

“As a longtime partner of Mellanox, we are thrilled to see the industry’s first 400G and 200G Ethernet switch offering adaptive routing and load balancing while guaranteeing Zero Packet,” said Mr. Chaoqun Sha, SVP of Technology at Sugon. “Spectrum-2 will give the industry the highest network and predictable performance, which is key to our providing our customers with world-class service and support.”

Availability

Spectrum-2 SDK is available now for early-access. The Spectrum-2 switch ASIC is expected to be available later this year.

Supporting Resources:

About Mellanox

Mellanox Technologies (NASDAQ: MLNX) is a leading supplier of end-to-end Ethernet and InfiniBand smart interconnect solutions and services for servers and storage. Mellanox interconnect solutions increase data center efficiency by providing the highest throughput and lowest latency, delivering data faster to applications and unlocking system performance capability. Mellanox offers a choice of fast interconnect products: adapters, switches, software and silicon that accelerate application runtime and maximize business results for a wide range of markets including high performance computing, enterprise data centers, Web 2.0, cloud, storage and financial services. More information is available at: www.mellanox.com.

Source: Mellanox

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Rescale Joins the Automotive Simulation Center Stuttgart

Thu, 07/06/2017 - 08:25

STUTTGART, Germany, July 6, 2017 — Rescale is pleased to announce that it has become a full member of the Automotive Simulation Center Stuttgart, or asc(s. The asc(s is a non-profit organization promoting high-performance simulation in virtual vehicle development. It consists of automotive OEMs and suppliers, software and hardware manufacturers, engineering service providers, and research institutes.

The vehicle design-to-manufacturing process is becoming increasingly simulation driven, but the sheer number of components and systems in a modern car makes multi-disciplinary design for crashworthiness, NVH, durability, fatigue, thermodynamics, electromagnetics, and fluid flow extremely challenging. Fortunately, simulation software and high-performance hardware have both made huge gains in capability over recent years and it’s now possible to simulate complex multi-physics system problems and even run large design of experiments (DOEs) and optimizations on scalable cloud data center hardware. Many IT departments with on-premise capacity are struggling to support cutting-edge applications such as deep learning for autonomous driving and electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) simulation, making cloud or hybrid-cloud simulation highly attractive.

Rescale offers a turnkey “big compute” solution for the automotive industry to exploit the best available software and hardware. Rescale works with a number of automotive customers including Honda, Nissan, Toyota, America Axle, Pinnacle Engines, Magna, and Siemens. Through its partners, Rescale has over 200 pre-installed software tools and over 60 worldwide data centers on tap. Applications include airflow over the vehicle, multibody impact, combustion effectiveness, oil flow, electromagnetic compatibility, and deep learning for autonomous driving.

“Rescale is delighted to be accepted as a member of asc(s,” said Wolfgang Dreyer, Rescale’s EMEA General Manager. “asc(s provides a forum for simulation innovation across the European automotive sector and Rescale is enabling scalable, turnkey on-demand high-performance computing, all pivotal for making automotive simulation cost-effective, fast, and efficient. We look forward to working with the members of the association to better understand industry requirements and trends and to push the boundaries of automotive simulation.”

About asc(s

The asc(s is a non-profit association for know-how carriers in the field of automotive simulation. The company provides its members with the possibility to advance new simulation methods for virtual vehicle development fast and efficiently – particularly if these place high demands on the computing power and data volume.

The asc(s promotes, supports and realises the method development in the field of automotive simulation. Being an interest group and multiplier, the association can offer its members a wide range of services and activities. The main focus of the activities is the concentration of expertise from the automotive and supply industry, software and hardware manufacturers, engineering service providers and research institutes. The asc(s provides the environment for cooperation. Enterprises work hand in hand at the asc(s, thus gaining new impulses for the development of their products.

About Rescale

Rescale is the global leader for high-performance computing simulations and deep learning in the cloud. Trusted by the Global Fortune 500, Rescale empowers the world’s top scientists and engineers to develop the most innovative new products and perform groundbreaking research and development faster and at lower cost. Rescale’s ScaleX platform transforms traditional fixed IT resources into flexible hybrid, private, and public cloud resources—built on the largest and most powerful high-performance computing network in the world. For more information on Rescale’s ScaleX platform, visit www.rescale.com.

Source: Rescale

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Mercury Systems Acquires Richland Technologies, LLC

Thu, 07/06/2017 - 07:06

ANDOVER, Mass., July 6, 2017 — Mercury Systems, Inc. (NASDAQ: MRCY, www.mrcy.com) today announced that it has acquired Richland Technologies, LLC (RTL). Based in Duluth, Ga., RTL specializes in safety-critical and high integrity systems, software, and hardware development as well as safety-certification services for mission-critical applications. In addition, the Company is a leader in safety-certifiable embedded graphics software for commercial and military aerospace applications. The acquisition complements Mercury’s acquisition of Creative Electronic Systems (CES) last November by providing additional capabilities in safety-critical markets as well as the opportunity to leverage RTL’s U.S. presence and expertise. Together, the RTL and CES acquisitions position Mercury uniquely as a leading provider of secure and safety-critical processing subsystems for aerospace and defense customers. Terms of the transaction were not disclosed. The acquisition is not expected to have a material impact on Mercury’s financial results for the first quarter or full fiscal year 2018. Mercury intends to maintain RTL’s presence in Duluth, Ga.

“We are very pleased to welcome RTL to the Mercury family,” said Mark Aslett, Mercury’s President and Chief Executive Officer. “Mercury gained a very strong footprint in safety-critical avionics with the acquisition of CES, based in Geneva, Switzerland, which we have renamed and is now operating as Mercury Mission Systems International (MMSI) as part of our Sensor and Mission Processing product line. The combination of RTL with MMS gives us a strong U.S. presence in the safety-critical avionics market, adding significant systems engineering, safety-critical software and hardware development and certification expertise to our existing mission computing portfolio. These new capabilities will enhance Mercury’s market penetration in commercial aerospace, defense platform management, C4I and mission computing – markets that are very closely aligned with Mercury’s existing market focus,” Aslett concluded.

For more information on Mercury Systems visit www.mrcy.com or contact Mercury at (866) 627-6951 or info@mrcy.com.

About Mercury Systems

Mercury Systems (NASDAQ:MRCY) is a leading commercial provider of secure sensor and mission processing subsystems. Optimized for customer and mission success, Mercury’s solutions power a wide variety of critical defense and intelligence programs. Headquartered in Andover, Mass., Mercury is pioneering a next-generation defense electronics business model specifically designed to meet the industry’s current and emerging technology needs. To learn more, visit www.mrcy.com.

Source: Mercury Systems

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NCSA Grants $2.6M in Blue Waters Awards to Illinois Researchers

Thu, 07/06/2017 - 07:03

URBANA, Ill., July 6, 2017 — The National Center for Supercomputing Applications (NCSA) at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign has awarded 3,697,000 node hours (NH) of time on the Blue Waters supercomputer to Illinois researchers from Spring 2017 proposal submissions.

The combined value of these awards is over $2.6 million dollars, and through the life of the Blue Waters program, NCSA has awarded over 43 million node hours to UI researchers—a value of nearly $27 million. Some of the time allocated for Blue Waters will go to projects that focus on HIV research, Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) simulations, genomics and global warming research.

NCSA researchers Eliu Huerta and Roland Haas will use their 495,000 NH allocation to generate catalogs of numerical relativity (NR) simulations with the open source, NR software called the Einstein Toolkit. NCSA is a an official member of the LIGO Scientific Collaboration (LSC), and Huerta and Haas share these simulations with the LSC to contribute to the validation of new gravitational wave transients.

Why Blue Waters? When LIGO detects a new gravitational wave transient, the NR waveforms are used to validate the astrophysical origin of the signal, and to constrain its astrophysical parameters. This time-critical analysis requires dozens of NR simulations, each requiring thousands of Blue Waters node hours of computer time that must be run in parallel to sample a higher dimensional parameter space. No other resource but Blue Waters can provide the required computational power on short notice.

Tandy Warnow, a professor in computer science and bioengineering at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, has been awarded 125,000 NH for her work on improving methods for phylogenomics, proteomics and metagenomics.

“The Blue Waters allocation is allowing us to develop new methods with much greater accuracy by testing and refining our algorithmic designs, so that we end up with new computational methods that are much more accurate than any current method, and that can scale to ultra-large datasets. None of this would be possible without Blue Waters!”

Juan Perilla and Jodi Hadden, researchers in the Theoretical and Computational Biophysics Group at the Beckman Institute, were allocated 582,000 NH for research focusing on virus capsids, the interactions of virus capsids with human factors and with antiviral drugs. Perilla says he and Hadden will use the allocation to study the effects of assembly inhibitor on the Hepatitis-B virus capsid and the HIV-1 capsid. “Blue Waters enables us to perform accurate, all-atom simulations of drug-compounds bound to the viral capsid and allows us to perform large-scale analysis of the results from the simulations,” said Pedilla.

Atmospheric sciences associate professor, Ryan Sriver and PhD candidate, Hui Li are using Blue Waters to explore the interactions between tropical cyclones (e.g. hurricanes) and Earth’s climate.

Sriver and Li are conducting a series of high-resolution global climate simulations using the Community Earth System Model (CESM), which features a 25 km atmosphere component capable of capturing realistic tropical cyclone activity—number, location, intensity—on a global scale. Results will enable key insights into the importance of tropical cyclones within Earth’s coupled climate system, as well as how storm activity may change in the future.

Narayana R. Aluru, Department of Mechanical Science and Engineering, could not perform the molecular dynamic simulations without the petascale power of Blue Waters. Aluru’s work focuses on systematic, thermodynamically consistent, structure-based coarse graining of room temperature ionic liquids. “Since the size of these ions is several nanometers and their interactions are highly dominated by electrostatics, the all-atom simulation of these systems is computationally expensive but critical. We perform molecular dynamics simulations which involve up to 400,000 atoms. These computationally expensive computations would not be possible to perform without a petascale supercomputer (Blue Waters),” said Aluru.

“The goal of our project is to uncover principles that drive the evolution of function in proteins,” said Gustavo Caetano-Anollés of the Department of Crop Sciences at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. “During previous Blue Waters allocations, we have performed 87 and 116 molecular dynamics simulations of protein loops on the timescales of approximately 10-12 and 50-70 nanoseconds, respectively,” said Caetano-Anollés. “In order to accomplish our goals in a timely fashion, we take advantage of efficient scalability on the NAMD simulation system in Blue Waters. Scalability coupled with GPU-computing provides acceleration gain vital to completing a project of this magnitude.”

“Using Blue Waters will allow us to self-consistently address the entire sequence of events leading to the development of a geomagnetic storm, and for the first time, to assess the implications of the induced electric fields to the enhancements of the near-Earth currents. This will provide the connection between the macro-scale dynamics and micro-scale processes leading to the development of a geomagnetic storm. As a result, this will significantly improve our space weather prediction capabilities,” said Raluca Ilie, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, about the impact of Blue Waters on her work, “Quantifying the Effects of Inductive Electric Fields in the Terrestrial Magnetosphere.”

Other researchers awarded Blue Waters allocations for Spring 2017 include:

  • Stuart Shapiro (Department of Physics), Milton RuizAntonios Tsokaros and Vasileios Paschalidis: 500,000 NH for “Gravitational and Electromagnetic Signatures of Compact Binary Mergers: General Relativistic Simulations at the Petascale”
  • Matthew West (Department of Atmospheric Sciences), Nicole Riemer and Jeffrey H. Curtis: 240,000 NH for “Verification of a Global Aerosol Model using a 3D Particle-Resolved Model”
  • Hsi-Yu Schive (NCSA), Matthew TurkJohn ZuhoneNathan Goldbaum and Jeremiah Ostriker: 230,000 NH for “Ultra-High Resolution Astrophysical Simulations with GAMER”
  • Aleksei Aksimentiev (Department of Physics): 225,000 NH for “Epigenetic Regulation of Chromatin Structure and Dynamics”
  • Mark Neubauer (Department of Physics), Philip ChangRob Gardner and Dewen Zhong: 140,000 NH for “Enabling Discoveries at the Large Hadron Collider through Advanced Computation and Deep Learning”
  • Benjamin Hooberman (Department of Physics), Amir FarbinMatt Zhang and Ryan Reece: 125,000 NH for “Employing Deep Learning Techniques for Particle Identification at the Large Hadron Collider”
  • Nancy Makri (Department of Chemistry), Peter Walters and Amartya Bose: 100,000 NH for “Quantum-Classical Path Integral Simulation of Charge Transfer Reactions”
  • Brad Sutton (Department of Bioengineering), Curtis JohnsonAlex Cerjanic and Aaron Anderson: 100,000 NH for “HPC-Based Approaches for High-Resolution, Quantitative MRI Applications”
  • Brian Thomas (Department of Mechanical Science & Engineering): 75,000 NH for “Multiphysics Modeling of Steel Continuous Casting”

Source: NCSA

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NSF Provides Status Report on U.S. Doctorate Education

Thu, 07/06/2017 - 07:00

The U.S. remains a potent factory for doctorate degrees according to the most recent National Science Foundation Survey of Earned Doctorates (SED). In 2015 the U.S. awarded 55,006 research doctorate degrees, the most ever recorded in the SED, with lion’s share awarded in science and engineering fields. Math and computer sciences remained the most desirable doctorates in terms of income and immediate job prospects but accounted for a small proportion of all doctorates awarded.

The 2015 SED report, which was posted late last week on the NSF web site, warned continued U.S. preeminence is not a given:

“The American system of doctoral education is widely considered to be among the world’s best, as evidenced by the large and growing number of international students each year—many of them among the top students in their countries—who choose to pursue the doctoral degree at U.S. universities. But the continued preeminence of U.S. doctoral education is not assured. Other nations, recognizing the contributions doctorate recipients make to economies and cultures, are investing heavily in doctoral education. Unless doctoral education in the United States continues to improve, the world’s brightest students, including U.S. citizens, may go elsewhere for the doctoral degree, and they may begin careers elsewhere as well.”

Noteworthy, the study deliberately omits professional degrees such as M.D., J.D., and PsyD which are aimed at professional practices rather than research jobs. Top line trends cited in the latest SED report include:

  • Science and engineering (S&E) degrees continued a 40-year trend of outpacing non-S&E degrees.
  • From 1975 to 2015, the number of S&E degrees more than doubled, with an average annual growth of 1.9 percent.
  • The number of non-S&E degrees awarded in 2015 is virtually identical to the number awarded in 1975. As a result of the different growth rates, the proportion of S&E doctorates climbed from 58 percent in 1975 to 75 percent in 2015.
  • The number of S&E doctorates awarded to temporary visa holders grew to 14,037 in 2015, up 2 percent compared to the previous year and up 30 percent since 2005.
  • The number of S&E doctorates awarded in 2015 to U.S. citizens and permanent residents grew to 24,547 in 2015, up 3 percent from the previous year and 43 percent since 2005.
  • During the 2005 to 2015 period, 10 countries accounted for 71 percent of the doctorates awarded to temporary visa holders. The top three — China, India and South Korea — accounted for more than half of the doctorates awarded to temporary visa holders.
  • “Women earned 46 percent of all doctorates in 2015, continuing a trend of women’s increasing prevalence in the annual total of recipients.

The study is replete with statistics and readily navigable online.” What follows is a very brief sampling of SED findings.

More Doctorates Being Awarded
As shown here, the number of doctorates awarded has risen steadily. Science and engineering degrees, as noted earlier, have grown fastest. That said, the relative number of students pursuing math and computer sciences doctorates hasn’t grown much. It’s now around seven percent of the total science and engineering doctorates awarded and still ranks last among disciplines.

 

Women Still Underrepresented in Sciences
As noted in the report, women’s share of doctorates awarded has grown over the past two decades. In 2015 women earned the majority of doctorates awarded in every broad field of study except physical and earth sciences, mathematics and computer sciences, and engineering. Contrarily, women’s share of math and computer sciences doctorates was nearly static. Indeed attracting women to HPC has long been a challenge and goal at NSF and elsewhere in the HPC community.

“Although women earned only about one-third of the 2015 doctorates awarded in physical and earth sciences and less than one-fourth of the doctorates in engineering, their relative shares of doctorates awarded in those fields has been growing rapidly. From 2005 to 2015, the proportion of doctorates in physical and earth sciences awarded to women increased by 6 percentage points, and the share of women in engineering grew by 5 percentage points. The proportion of female doctorate recipients in mathematics and computer sciences has grown more modestly, by 1 percentage point from 2005 to 2015.”

 

Job Market for Doctorates is Static
Job markets are always subject to generalized economic swings; that said the NSF study reports newly-minted S&E doctorates in 2015 often faced stiff challenges as measured again past trends.

“In every broad science and engineering (S&E) field, the proportion of 2015 doctorate recipients who reported definite commitments for employment or postdoctoral (postdoc) study was at or near the lowest level of the past 15 years, and it was 4 to 13 percentage points below the proportion reported in 2006, the most recent high point in definite commitments for S&E fields.”

 

Foreign Students – Stay or Return?
Given President Trump’s ongoing efforts to tighten visa and immigration regulation, there has been a good deal of discussion around foreign graduate students. This 2015 study doesn’t capture that dynamic but it does present some detail around where doctoral students come from and what their plans are for remaining in the U.S. or not. This section of the report is best read directly.

Perhaps not surprisingly, China is the dominant country of origin for doctoral student followed by India and South Korea. Europe, of course, has a well-developed graduate educational infrastructure.

 

Link to NSF summary article: https://nsf.gov/news/news_summ.jsp?cntn_id=242416&org=NSF&from=news

Link to the full NSF 2015 SED report: https://www.nsf.gov/statistics/2017/nsf17306/report/about-this-report.cfm

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Nvidia, Baidu Expand AI Partnership 

Wed, 07/05/2017 - 13:28

Today at its developer conference in Beijing, Baidu announced a broadening of its AI partnership with Nvidia, including plans to bring Nvidia’s recently announced 120 TFLOPS Volta GPUs to Baidu Cloud and adoption of Nvidia’s DRIVE PX platform for Baidu’s newly named “Apollo” self-driving car strategy.

Although the companies did not disclose financial details, Nvidia stock jumped nearly 4 percent within hours of the announcement of the deal, which expands the Nividia’s entre to the vast potential of the Chinese market.

In addition, Baidu said it will optimize Baidu’s open source PaddlePaddle open source deep learning framework for Volta GPUs and bring AI capabilities to the Chinese consumer market by adding Baidu’s Duer OS voice-recognition AI system to Nvidia SHIELD TV.

“We see AI transforming every industry, and our strategy is to help democratize AI everywhere, in every cloud, in every AI framework, from the datacenter to the edge to the self-driving car,” said Ian Buck, Nvidia vice president and general manager of accelerated computing, in a pre-announcement press briefing.

Baidu also announced it will deploy in its datacenters Nvidia’s HGX reference architecture with Tesla Volta V100 and Tesla P4 GPU accelerators for AI training and inference. Combined with Baidu’s PaddlePaddle deep learning framework and Nvidia’s TensorRT deep learning inference software, “researchers and companies can harness state-of-the-art technology to develop products and services with real-time understanding of images, speech, text and video,” Nvidia said.

The availability of the Volta GPU architecture within the PaddlePaddle deep learning framework is aimed at supporting researchers and companies, along with Baidu, develop AI applications for search rankings, image classification services, real-time speech understanding, visual character recognition and other AI-powered services.

In announcing its selection of Nvidia’s DRIVE PX 2 AI supercomputer for its open source Apollo autonomous vehicle platform, Baidu said Apollo will also incorporate Tesla GPUs along with Nvidia CUDA and TensorRT software, adding that the self-driving car that Baidu showed recently at CES Asia was powered by DRIVE PX 2.

Several Chinese automakers today announced that they will join the Eco Partner Alliance of Apollo, including Changan, Chery Automobile, FAW, and Greatwall Motor.

In the Chinese AI home market, Baidu Duer OS, the company’s conversational AI system, will provide voice command capabilities to NVIDIA’s SHIELD TV for streaming video, gaming and smart home assistance. A version of the streamer, with custom software made for China, will be available later this year.

“NVIDIA and Baidu have pioneered significant advances in deep learning and AI,” said Buck. “We believe AI is the most powerful technology force of our time, with the potential to revolutionize every industry. Our collaboration aligns our exceptional technical resources to create AI computing platforms for all developers – from academic research, startups creating breakthrough AI applications, and autonomous vehicles.”

Editor’s note: This article first appeared in HPCwire’s sister publication EnterpriseTech.

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SC17 Registration is Now Open

Wed, 07/05/2017 - 12:35

DENVER, Co., July 5, 2017 — Registration for SC17—the premier international conference on high performance computing, networking, storage and analysis—officially opens today, Wednesday, July 5.

SC17 continues the long tradition of a  robust and engaging program.  Specifically, this year SC17 offers a very competitive paper program with 327 submissions  – of which only 61 papers were accepted. It truly will be the best of the best. In addition, there will be lively discussions in 12 panels, and a variety of half- and full-day workshops will complement the overall Technical Program.

An important note: The fee structure for SC17 makes it advantageous to register early. Registering early for the Technical Program can save you up to $275 off your registration (depending on your registration category). Also, registering for Tutorials by October 15 can save you up to $350 off that registration. Register early for both the Technical Program and Tutorials and save up to $625!

Click here for more information and to register.

Source: SC17

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Mellanox Schedules Release of Q2 2017 Financial Results

Wed, 07/05/2017 - 10:51

SUNNYVALE, Calif. & YOKNEAM, Israel, July 5, 2017 — Mellanox Technologies, Ltd. (NASDAQ: MLNX), a leading supplier of high-performance, end-to-end interconnect solutions for data center servers and storage systems, today announced that it will release its financial results for the second quarter 2017 after the market closes on Wednesday, July 26, 2017.

Following the release, Mellanox will conduct a conference call at 2 p.m. Pacific Time (5 p.m. Eastern Time). To listen to the call: dial +1-888-632-3384 (non-U.S. residents: +1-785-424-1675) approximately ten minutes prior to the start time.

The Mellanox financial results conference call will be available, via a live webcast, on the investor relations section of the Mellanox website at: http://ir.mellanox.com.

Interested parties may access the website 15 minutes prior to the start of the call to download and install any necessary audio software. An archived webcast replay will also be available on the Mellanox website.

About Mellanox

Mellanox Technologies (NASDAQ: MLNX) is a leading supplier of end-to-end Ethernet and InfiniBand intelligent interconnect solutions and services for servers, storage, and hyper-converged infrastructure. Mellanox’s intelligent interconnect solutions increase data center efficiency by providing the highest throughput and lowest latency, delivering data faster to applications and unlocking system performance. Mellanox offers a choice of high performance solutions: network and multicore processors, network adapters, switches, cables, software and silicon, that accelerate application runtime and maximize business results for a wide range of markets including high performance computing, enterprise data centers, Web 2.0, cloud, storage, network security, telecom and financial services. More information is available at www.mellanox.com.

Source: Mellanox

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Brookhaven Lab Hosts Five-Day GPU Hackathon

Wed, 07/05/2017 - 09:51
From June 5 through 9, Brookhaven Lab’s Computational Science Initiative hosted “Brookathon”

July 5, 2017 — On June 5, coding “sprinters”—teams of computational, theoretical, and domain scientists; software developers; and graduate and postdoctoral students—took their marks at the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Brookhaven National Laboratory, beginning the first of five days of nonstop programming from early morning until night. During this coding marathon, or “hackathon,” they learned how to program their scientific applications on devices for accelerated computing called graphics processing units (GPUs). Guiding them toward the finish line were GPU programming experts from national labs, universities, and technology companies who donated their time to serve as mentors. The goal by the end of the week was for the teams new to GPU programming to leave with their applications running on GPUs—or at least with the knowledge of how to do so—and for the teams who had come with their applications already accelerated on GPUs to leave with an optimized version.

The era of GPU-accelerated computing 

GPU-accelerated computing—the combined use of GPUs and central processing units (CPUs)—is increasingly being used as a way to run applications much faster. Computationally intensive portions of an application are offloaded from the CPU, which consists of a few cores optimized for serial processing (tasks execute one at a time in sequential order), to the GPU, which contains thousands of smaller, more efficient cores optimized for parallel processing (multiple tasks are processed simultaneously).

Nicholas D’Imperio, chair of Brookhaven Lab’s Computational Science Laboratory, holds a graphics processing unit (GPU) made by NVIDIA.

However, while GPUs potentially offer a very high memory bandwidth (rate at which data can be stored in and read from memory by a processor) and arithmetic performance for a wide range of applications, they are currently difficult to program. One of the challenges is that developers cannot simply take the existing code that runs on a CPU and have it automatically run on a GPU; they need to rewrite or adapt portions of the code. Another challenge is efficiently getting data onto the GPUs in the first place, as data transfer between the CPU and GPU can be quite slow. Though parallel programming standards such as OpenACC and GPU advances such as hardware and software for managing data transfer make these processes easier, GPU-accelerated computing is still a relatively new concept.

A hackathon with a history

Here’s where “Brookathon,” hosted by Brookhaven Lab’s Computational Science Initiative(CSI) and jointly organized with DOE’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Stony Brook University, and the University of Delaware, came in.

“The architecture of GPUs, which were originally designed to display graphics in video games, is quite different from that of CPUs,” said CSI computational scientist Meifeng Lin, who coordinated Brookathon with the help of an organizing committee and was a member of one of the teams participating in the event. “People are not used to programming GPUs as much as CPUs. The goal of hackathons like Brookathon is to lessen the learning curve, enabling the use of GPUs on next-generation high-performance-computing (HPC) systems for scientific applications.”

Brookathon is the latest in a series of GPU hackathons that first began in 2014 at Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility (OLCF)—a DOE Office of Science User Facility that is home to the nation’s most powerful science supercomputer, Titan, and other hybrid CPU-GPU systems. So far, OLCF’s Fernanda Foertter, a HPC user support specialist and programmer, has helped organize and host 10 hackathons across the United States and abroad, including Brookathon and one at the Jülich Supercomputing Centre in Germany earlier this year.

Members of the organizing committee explain the motivation behind Brookathon and the other hackathons in the series, and participants and mentors discuss their experiences.

“Hackathons are intense team-based training events,” said Foertter. “The hope is that the teams go home and continue to work on their codes.”

The idea to host at Brookhaven started in May 2016, when Lin and Brookhaven colleagues attended their first GPU hackathon, hosted at the University of Delaware. There, they worked on a code for lattice quantum chromodynamics (QCD) simulations, which help physicists understand the interactions between particles called quarks and gluons. But in using the OpenACC programming standard, they realized it did not sufficiently support the C++ programming language that their code library was written in. Around this time, Brookhaven became a member of OpenACC so that CSI scientists could help shape the standard to include the features needed to support their codes on GPUs. Through the University of Delaware hackathon and weekly calls with OpenACC members, Lin came into contact with Foertter and Sunita Chandrasekaran, an assistant professor of computer science at the University of Delaware who organized that hackathon, both of whom were on board with bringing a hackathon to Brookhaven.

“Brookhaven had just gotten a computing cluster with GPUs, so the timing was great,” said Lin. “In CSI’s Computational Science Laboratory, where I work, we get a lot of requests from scientists around Brookhaven to get their codes to run on GPUs. Hackathons provide the intense hands-on mentoring that helps to make this happen.”

Teams from near and far

A total of 22 applications were submitted for a spot at Brookathon, half of which came from Brookhaven Lab or nearby Stony Brook University teams. According to Lin, Brookathon received the highest number of applications of any of the hackathons to date. Ultimately, a review committee of OpenACC members accepted applications from 10 teams, each of which brought a different application to accelerate on GPUs:

  • Team AstroGPU from Stony Brook University: codes for simulating astrophysical fluid flows
  • Team Grid Makers from Brookhaven, Fermilab, Boston University, and the University of Utah (Lin’s team): a multigrid solver for linear equations and a general data-parallel library (called Grid), both related to application development for lattice QCD under DOE’s Exascale Computing Project
  • Team HackDpotato from Stony Brook University: a genetic algorithm for protein simulation
  • Team Lightning Speed OCT (for optical coherence tomography) from Lehigh University: a program for real-time image processing and three-dimensional image display of biological tissues
  • Team MUSIC (for MUScl for Ion Collision) from Brookhaven and Stony Brook University: a code for simulating the evolution of the quark-gluon plasma produced at Brookhaven’s Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC)—a DOE Office of Science User Facility
  • Team NEK/CEED from DOE’s Argonne National Laboratory, the University of Minnesota, and the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign: fluid dynamics and electromagnetic codes (Nek5000 and NekCEM, respectively) for modeling small modular reactors (SMR) and graphene-based surface materials—related to two DOE Exascale Computing Projects, Center for Efficient Exascale Discretizations (CEED) and ExaSMR
  • Team Stars from the STAR from Brookhaven, Central China Normal University, and Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics: an online cluster-finding algorithm for the energy-deposition clusters measured at Brookhaven’s Solenoidal Tracker at RHIC (STAR) detector, which searches for signatures of the quark-gluon plasma
  • Team The Fastest Trigger of the East from the UK’s Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Lancaster University, and Queen Mary University of London: software that reads out data in real time from 40,000 photosensors that collect light generated by neutrino particles, discards the useless majority of the data, and sends the useful bits to be written to disk for future analysis; the software will be used in a particle physics experiment in Japan (Hyper-Kamiokande)
  • Team UD-AccSequencer from the University of Delaware: a code for an existing next-generation-sequencing tool for aligning thousands of DNA sequences (BarraCUDA)
  • Team Uduh from the University of Delaware and the University of Houston: a code for molecular dynamics simulations, which scientists use to study the interactions between molecules

“The domain scientists—not necessarily computer science programmers—who come together for five days to migrate their scientific codes to GPUs are very excited to be here,” said Chandrasekaran. “From running into compiler and runtime errors during programming and reaching out to compiler developers for help to participating in daily scrum sessions to provide progress updates, the teams really have a hands-on experience in which they can accomplish a lot in a short amount of time.”

Read the full story at: https://www.bnl.gov/newsroom/news.php?a=212273

Source: BNL

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Argonne’s Theta Supercomputer Goes Online

Wed, 07/05/2017 - 08:33

ARGONNE, Ill., July 5, 2017 — Theta, a new production supercomputer located at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Argonnne National Laboratory is officially open to the research community. The new machine’s massively parallel, many-core architecture continues Argonne’s leadership computing program towards its future Aurora system.

Theta was built onsite at the Argonne Leadership Computing Facility (ALCF), a DOE Office of Science User Facility, where it will operate alongside Mira, an IBM Blue Gene/Q supercomputer. Both machines are fully dedicated to supporting a wide range of scientific and engineering research campaigns. Theta, an Intel-Cray system, entered production on July 1.

The new supercomputer will immediately begin supporting several 2017-2018 DOE Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) Leadership Computing Challenge (ALCC) projects. The ALCC is a major allocation program that supports scientists from industry, academia, and national laboratories working on advancements in targeted DOE mission areas. Theta will also support projects from the ALCF Data Science Program, ALCF’s discretionary award program, and, eventually, the DOE’s Innovative and Novel Computing Computational Impact on Theory and Experiment (INCITE) program—the major means by which the scientific community gains access to the DOE’s fastest supercomputers dedicated to open science.

Designed in collaboration with Intel and Cray, Theta is a 9.65-petaflops system based on the second-generation Intel Xeon Phi processor and Cray’s high-performance computing software stack. Capable of nearly 10 quadrillion calculations per second, Theta will enable researchers to break new ground in scientific investigations that range from modeling the inner workings of the brain to developing new materials for renewable energy applications.

“Theta’s unique architectural features represent a new and exciting era in simulation science capabilities,” said ALCF Director of Science Katherine Riley. “These same capabilities will also support data-driven and machine-learning problems, which are increasingly becoming significant drivers of large-scale scientific computing.”

Now that Theta is available as a production resource, researchers can apply for computing time through the facility’s various allocation programs. Although the INCITE and ALCC calls for proposals recently closed, researchers can apply for Director’s Discretionary awards at any time.

Argonne National Laboratory seeks solutions to pressing national problems in science and technology. The nation’s first national laboratory, Argonne conducts leading-edge basic and applied scientific research in virtually every scientific discipline. Argonne researchers work closely with researchers from hundreds of companies, universities, and federal, state and municipal agencies to help them solve their specific problems, advance America’s scientific leadership and prepare the nation for a better future. With employees from more than 60 nations, Argonne is managed by UChicago Argonne, LLC for the U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Science.

The U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Science is the single largest supporter of basic research in the physical sciences in the United States and is working to address some of the most pressing challenges of our time. For more information, visit the Office of Science website.

Argonne National Laboratory seeks solutions to pressing national problems in science and technology. The nation’s first national laboratory, Argonne conducts leading-edge basic and applied scientific research in virtually every scientific discipline. Argonne researchers work closely with researchers from hundreds of companies, universities, and federal, state and municipal agencies to help them solve their specific problems, advance America’s scientific leadership and prepare the nation for a better future. With employees from more than 60 nations, Argonne is managed by UChicago Argonne, LLC for the U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Science.

The U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Science is the single largest supporter of basic research in the physical sciences in the United States and is working to address some of the most pressing challenges of our time. For more information, visit the Office of Science website.

Argonne National Laboratory seeks solutions to pressing national problems in science and technology. The nation’s first national laboratory, Argonne conducts leading-edge basic and applied scientific research in virtually every scientific discipline. Argonne researchers work closely with researchers from hundreds of companies, universities, and federal, state and municipal agencies to help them solve their specific problems, advance America’s scientific leadership and prepare the nation for a better future. With employees from more than 60 nations, Argonne is managed by UChicago Argonne, LLC for the U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Science.

The U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Science is the single largest supporter of basic research in the physical sciences in the United States and is working to address some of the most pressing challenges of our time. For more information, visit the Office of Science website.

Source: ANL

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